Posts Tagged ‘ exhibition ’

SARAY EXHIBITION, AGAIN…

It is with great joy that I invite everyone to see my video and sound installation up again, but this time at the foyer of the RoundHouse, in Camden Town, London. From modest Victorian beginnings – beginning life in 1846 as a steam-engine repair shed – to legendary cultural venue, the Roundhouse has an enviable heritage. The Grade II* listed building is now home to a bold and exciting programme of live music, theatre, dance, circus, installations and new media.

My installation will be part of the Accidental Festival.The Accidental Festival is a platform for showcasing a diverse mix of disciplines, genres and styles, a base for artists, musicians and performers to collaborate, to collide, to create something new. The Festival is committed to a dynamic community and education programme, welcoming all to take part, and creating a community for artists and audience, performers and creators and all those in between, uniting us all in a celebration of art in all its forms.

saray in a minute

I’ve edited a short version of my exhibition “Saray”, with a song from an south-african musician Steve Newman. enjoy!

SARAY

SARAY is a video installation about the memory process, the memory codes and genetic memory. It relates our ancestors and how we can feel nostalgic about a place or a moment that we never saw or lived before. Unifying my abilities as an art director, production designer and also video maker,  I’ve developed this work from a research trip to Sarajevo where my grandmother and great-grandmother were born, and linked my own past with the way our brain storage of long-term and short-term memory.

This video shows the opening night of the exhibition edited with some of the images that were at the TV’s. The exhibition was part of  Braziliality,  a non-for-profit cross-cultural project, showcasing artworks from Brazilian artists and the art from international artists inspired by Brazil, creating a 360 degrees perspective of the contemporary Brazilian art and culture influence. Our mission is to support new art particularly using technology and new talents that are inspired and related to Brazil.

ernesto neto

The visual art strand of the Southbank Centre’s 2010 ‘Festival Brazil’ features new work by the Brazilian artist Ernesto Neto. Neto returns to The Hayward after his showing in 2008’s ‘Psycho Building’, for which he created ‘Life Fog Frog’, an enormous membrane containing forms filled with spices. For his solo show, the Rio de Janeiro-based artist will use the upper galleries and outdoor sculpture terraces for a new site-specific commission and sculptural works that continue his sensory exploration of architectural space.

For me was a great experience to go to his exhibition not only because it was a brazilian artist but also because of the sensorial experience which allows my imagination and creativity to expand.

ideas for set, for theatre, for drawings, organic forms and smells have come like an invasion into my mind after the experience.

interview about my work

just after my private exhibition for “SARAY” I was interviewed by Canal Londres (www.canallondres.tv) , a brazilian web channel which shows brazilian people living in London, and talks about artists, concerts, gigs, theatre, or other interesting facts.

Unfortunately the video doesn’t have subtitles and the interview was done in portuguese, but even if you are not a portuguese speaker is worth seeing because has some images of my work, including the videos that were used on the video installation itself and also some images from the opening night at the gallery.

Was a great pleasure for me to have a video done explaining my work, so check it out online clicking HERE.

douglas gordon’s work

Looking for inspiration and references on video art, and video installation works, I found out about the Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (Glasgow, 1966).

Gordon is responsible for some of the most interesting artistic creations of the last years, covering fields such as cinematography, the audiovisual installations or even the literature, making him one of those artists who seem to refuse to be sorted in a certain style or tendency.

24-Hour Psycho (1993) is one of the most celebrated works by Gordon, and can be a perfect start point to his entire opera . A screen, placed diagonally in the middle of a quite dark hall, projects the famous film Psycho by Alfred Hitchcock, with the particularity that the emission, which lacks sound, is slowed down to the point of being increased its duration to 24 hours. Also, this screen is translucent and the film is projected on both sides of it, so when a spectator approaches to the screen is seen by the spectators placed on the other side, causing a strange interference in a so familiar film.

Much more ambitious, to the point of being hardly affordable for the spectator, is the work with the descriptive title of Pretty much every Film and Video work from about 1992 until now (1992-?). It consists in a large group of monitors showing, as the title warns, the entire cinematographic work by Gordon in the last 14 years. The monitors, some of them accompanied with headphones, are placed in different positions in every exhibition. I was very interested in this project, once I only saw his work after my exhibition, and I felt that my work os very much connected with his.

my exhibition

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